Ox cheeks slow-braised with ginger and plums

Slow-cooked ox cheeks are not often considered¬†summer food, so I’m not even going to try pleading that this has fruit in it. It’s just something tasty I worked up after seeing cheeks on the butcher’s counter, and not being able to say no.

Heck, the plums aren’t even in season, so that’s me done for, really. I imagine there’ll be a tutting, hemp-clad psychopomp strong-arming me to a McDonald’s of perpetual flame in the hereafter. Might as well enjoy the stew while I’m here.

Ox cheeks with ginger and plums

Actually, I’ve always thought seasonality was more inspirational than holy, and food miles are a bit of a crass simplification when you start factoring in other energy costs. Jay Rayner puts this all far better than I ever will, and anyway I’m drifting wildly off topic.

No, this is actually a way to bring some gentler, fresher flavours to what might be my new favourite cut of beef. It’s cribbed substantially from a River Cottage Every Day recipe my old housemate used to cook, but I’ve mucked about with the flavours and thrown plums at it.¬† Continue reading Ox cheeks slow-braised with ginger and plums

The Pint Shop, Cambridge

The centre of Cambridge is a miserable place to drink. I’m not going to rant about this, but between soulless chains, student vomit production-lines, and brave attempts that have failed by becoming a restaurant with an unconvincing pub-shaped mask on, there’s basically nowhere to go for a beer. So when the Pint Shop announced they’d be selling around ten craft keg beers, another five or so cask ales, and serving food while giving equal space to drinkers and diners it seemed a bit good to be true.

After having dinner there last week, I can confirm that it is both good and true.

The remains of ox cheeks at the Pint Shop

If you want to skip the rest of this review, the tl;dr is: go there and eat the Triple Cooked Ox Cheeks – they are heart-stoppingly delicious.

Continue reading The Pint Shop, Cambridge