Scott’s All Day – more brunch on Mill Rd

If you wanted to make a glib joke about Mill Road and gentrification, it might go something like an anecdote about a beloved curry house closing, being replaced by an absurdly niche-concept wine bar, and finally ending up as an all-day brunch joint that thinks a heap of kale is a fry-up.

Yeah well, it’s 2019. Irony is dead, the arctic is on fire, and the kale brunch is delicious.

Of course it comes with smashed avocado.

Scott’s All Day sits on the old site of The Golden Curry (and latterly Ony’s), and the Scott in question is Scott Holden, formerly of Fitzbillies. There are some lovely photos of the refit on Tim Hayward’s Instagram, and it’s a background that gives a bit of confidence that this incarnation of the site will fare a little better.

We first caught them on day two of opening, then again two weeks later. And while it’s safe to say they’ve had some teething troubles (two people down for lunch service today, poor sods!) it’s pretty promising so far.

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Ittou – Cambridge finally gets a ramen place

…and it’s ok!

Ramen – specifically tonkotsu ramen – is pretty great. Noodles in a rich broth, usually topped with chashu pork, spring onions, kombu, and a soft-boiled egg. It’s that particular kind of over-architected fast food where you’re taking twenty four hours and as many ingredients to make a pot noodle with delusions of grandeur, and I bloody love it.

As top-tier fancied up junk, I’ve been hoping for years that ramen shops would roll into town and pull Cambridge out from the burger event horizon.

Oh well, we’ve got one now.

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Atithi – a promising new curry house for Mill Rd

Have you ever read a review so bad you just had to visit the restaurant?

Chettinad Chicken Curry

After seeing this trickle of journalistic bin juice I felt that good or bad (it’s good) Atithi deserves better than a glib summary of their menu by someone who reads like they haven’t walked down Mill Road in a decade.

Happily, the food had significantly more depth than the puff piece.

Atithi offers thoughtful updates to curry house classics, with modern presentation and some interesting tasting and sharing menu options.

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Cambridge Cookery – the best brunch in town?

Let me tell you about one of the best things I’ve recently put in my mouth.

Naturally, it contained garlicky butter. But it also contained a few wonderful simple other things, and it was served at the bistro at the Cambridge Cookery School.

Cambridge Cookery Camembert Prosciutto

I’m not even talking about this sandwich, and it’s a great sandwich.

The bistro boasts “a strong Scandinavian and Italian influence”, as well as the customary local/sustainable/organic/crafted gubbins. While this sounded like fun, it did not prepare me for the Turkish Eggs. But I’ll get to that.

We went for brunch. We loved it, and we went back.
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Osteria Waggon and Horses, Milton (almost Cambridge)

Osteria Waggon and Horses* is in Milton. As the city grows out to meet it, that’s almost, a bit, if you squint, close enough to say that Cambridge finally has somewhere worth going for Italian food.

Crikey, that’s been a long time coming.

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Inside, it’s bright and airy with a little lounge area, and just a few bits of pub poking through. Yes, it says, this is a restaurant, but by all means have a drink – it’s not fussy. That’s the mood. Osteria was friendly, sociable, and delicious.

The menu’s simple, a few things to each course, the way I like it, and front-loaded with a range of little aperitivi to share. You could easily linger over plenty of those and a bottle or two of crisp white on a nice summer evening, before moving on to some pasta. That’s more or less what we did.

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Sticks n Sushi, Cambridge

Sushi elevates the useful cliché of little things counting for a lot to raison d’être. Perfect little touches are the whole deal. Sticks n Sushi served us pretty damn good sushi, but they delighted us up front with the best edamame beans I’ve eaten. Lightly seasoned, and grilled to bring out the savoury, these were just everything you want from a sushi appetizer, and they set the tone for a meal of quality produce with considered touches.

Table for 2 sushi platter - sticks n sushi

Sticks n Sushi has been open for a little over a month, but scheduling shenanigans mean I’ve only just managed to get there. While they’re new in Cambridge, they’ve been going for twenty-two years, have twelve branches in Copenhagen, and another four in London. The deal is a slight sushi modernization, yakitori on the side, without recourse to overbearing fusion.

It works.

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Bundobust, Leeds – sensational Indian street food (and craft beer)

This weekend we were up in Leeds for the Thought Bubble comics festival (podcast here). Even when it isn’t full of enthusiastic nerds Leeds is a fun city. It’s got some storming places to drink beer, a lively (and growing) food scene, and since 2014 it’s had Bundobust.

This is one of the best places I’ve eaten all year.

It’s also – and get this – completely vegetarian. In fact, it’s often vegan. How cool is that? Packed to the gills in Leeds centre, serving eclectic veggie street food and exciting beer that puts some of my Soho favourites to hide-under-a-rock levels of shame.

Bundobust selection

So what’s it doing?

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Reys, Cambridge – rotisserie chicken

Reynard is a trickster figure, a Loki-ish fox dude from Medieval picaresque. “Renard”  is the French word for fox. Foxes are of course iconically partial to a spot of chicken, and Reys is a rotisserie chicken restaurant that’s gone in hard on the impish vulpine branding. All orange and jaunty furnishings, the chairs have foxtail stripes. That’s certainly cuter than blood and feathers in the henhouse.

Reys, Cambridge - downstairsThey sell roast chicken. It tastes like good roast chicken, and it doesn’t cost too much.

Everything else is just a little peculiar. There’s this slight Korean edge running through the menu that doesn’t quite sit with the Ikea farmhouse ambience, never really explained. The starters are cursory. But the chicken is fine. It just all doesn’t quite make sense.

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The Brunswick Centre street food market

If you’re anything like me, you’ll have a hard time deciding which you’re more excited by: modernist architecture or duck confit. Squatting in the middle of Bloomsbury like the ziggurat of some concrete-fancying south american snake god – with more Saturday morning street food market, less blood sacrifice – the Brunswick Centre spoils us for both.

Adi's Duck Confit at the Brunswick food market

The Brunswick Centre is a ten minute walk from King’s Cross, or right outside Russell Square tube. It’s a brutal/modern delight. It’s got a decent cinema, a big Waitrose, there’s a dedicated gay bookshop down the road, and a genuinely great burger joint opposite. But it hasn’t historically been so hot for food. It’s chain town: Giraffe, Yo Sushi, Carluccio’s, you get the idea.

This doesn’t matter so much because you’re a short walk from the entirety of central fucking London. But sometimes I’m nearby and feeling lazy, and so the Saturday morning food market is a godsend. Sent, specifically, from Brutalist Quetzalcoatl, I’d imagine.

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Koya, Soho – any noodle as long as it’s udon

Koya is a Soho noodle bar, up Frith St, just past the jazz club.
(Someone just filled their bingo card).

Sadly, it’s also set to close in May this year. Sadface. Much sadface. Thankfully its sister bar (two doors down) will remain.

I say “noodle bar” – it serves mostly udon, with a range of soups, sauces, and dressings. Some are hot, some are cold, the specials are nifty, and it’s a good time. Koya, crab and cockles We ducked in for lunch, making it barely in time for their 2:45 last orders, and there was still a (very short) queue. That’s encouraging. As was the service – friendly and attentive, and from a gentleman who seemed like he’d be more at home in a Jeffrey Bernard era Soho all-night Italian dive. Splendid.

Décor is simple, specials skew seasonal, livening up the rather dull basic sides, and udon are probably my favourite noodles.
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